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Dentistry Library Photo interior
Dentistry Library Photo interior
Dentistry Library Photo interior

Research Guides

News

The University of Toronto Libraries will be launching a new way to search our collection in January 2021.

Our staff is online to support our students, staff and faculty.

Image of books

A list of new e-books that you can access from home is now available on our blog.

Workshops

Date: Wednesday, January 20, 2021
Time: 1:00pm - 2:30pm
Location: Online
Campus: St. George (Downtown) Campus

In a series of three workshops, learn to navigate the complex world of government information which provides official, authoritative, primary sources for almost every topic. 

Parliamentary and legislative materials:

Want to uncover the documentary paper trail of legislative decision making and policy formation? This session will introduce search strategies and resources for finding a breadth of primary sources such as debates, drafts of bills, stakeholder input via committee transcripts and testimony, laws and regulations. 

Open to University of Toronto students, faculty, and staff.
More information on other events in the series: https://go.utlib.ca/govinfo

 

Date: Monday, January 25, 2021
Time: 12:00pm - 1:00pm
Presenter: Adriana Sgro
Location: Online
Campus: UTSC

This session will occur online and is facilitated by the University of Toronto Scarborough Campus Makerspace. It is part of the library's Maker Monday Series.

Facilitators:

  • Adriana Sgro, Library Technician Reference & Makerspace Assistant | User Services, University of Toronto Scarborough Library

An overview of a free 3D design program. Tinkercad is a powerful, yet great for beginners.

At the end of the workshop, you will be able to make a basic 3D shape in Tinkercad and be able to export it.

 

 

Date: Monday, January 25, 2021
Time: 2:00pm - 4:00pm
Location: Online
Campus: St. George (Downtown) Campus

Research and Writing Seminars: Develop Your Scholarly Voice. Each session in this suite of four interactive seminars integrates the learning of academic research and writing skills and is taught by a librarian in collaboration with a writing instructor. The goal of each seminar is to help you develop your own voice as an emerging scholar by enabling you to identify, situate and substantiate your arguments in the context of the scholarly discussion taking place in your discipline. The seminars are designed for humanities and social sciences undergraduate students. Graduate students might wish to consider the research-related skills offerings in the Graduate Professional Skills Program.

Take any three (3) of the four (4) seminars to earn credit on your Co-Curricular Record.

Writing to Cite

Learn how to develop effective strategies for academic research and how to correctly incorporate primary and secondary sources into your essays. Through short lectures, interactive class discussions and hands-on exercises, you will learn:

  • The role of citation practices in the scholarly conversation
  • The various styles of documentation
  • The mechanics of “writing up” your sources
  • The different types of publications and how to integrate and document your use of them
  • To incorporate close reading to develop your own research interests and arguments
  • What ideas you can claim as your own and which ones you cannot
  • How to avoid inadvertent plagiarism

Key terms for this session: close reading, signaling, quoting, paraphrasing

Location: Online via Zoom. The link to the session will be sent to you in the confirmation email upon registration.  

Other seminars in this series include:

  • Critical Reading
  • Annotated Bibliographies
  • Literature Reviews
Date: Wednesday, January 27, 2021
Time: 1:00pm - 2:30pm
Location: Online
Campus: St. George (Downtown) Campus

In a series of three workshops, learn to navigate the complex world of government information which provides official, authoritative, primary sources for almost every topic.

Historical government information & government financial documents: 

Government information, which can span decades if not centuries, offers primary and often detailed evidence on almost every topic in history. Come and explore different perspectives of world events from documents issued by various national governments. This session will also introduce core government financial documents which can be used for tracking spending and digging deeper into historical and contemporary policy. The budget, public accounts, and the estimates will be presented, including their functions and potential use cases in a variety of research scenarios.

Open to University of Toronto students, faculty, and staff.
More information on other events in the series: https://go.utlib.ca/govinfo

New Books October 2020

complex dental implant complications cover
Complex Dental Implant Complications [electronic resource]
functional aesthetic dentistry cover
Functional Aesthetic Dentistry [electronic resource]
emerging therapies in periodontics cover
Emerging Therapies in Periodontics [electronic resource]
molar incisor hypomineralization cover
Molar Incisor Hypomineralization [electronic resource]
moderate sedation and emergency medicine for periodontists cover
Moderate Sedation and Emergency Medicine for Periodontists [electronic resource]
gerodontology essentials cover
Gerodontology Essentials for Health Care Professionals [electronic resource]
mathematical models for dental materials cover
Mathematical Models for Dental Materials Research
applications of biomedical engineering cover
Applications of Biomedical Engineering in Dentistry [electronic resource]
tumors and tumor-like lesions of bone cover
Tumors and Tumor-Like Lesions of Bone [electronic resource]
breath odors cover
Breath odors [electronic resource]
salivary bioscience cover
Salivary Bioscience [electronic resource]
esthetic oral rehabilitation with veneers cover
Esthetic Oral Rehabilitation with Veneers [electronic resource]