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Major resources

Contact Us

124 Edward St., Room 267
Toronto, ON, M5G 6G1
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Featured titles

Basics of dental technology : a step by step approach /
Handbook of research on computerized occlusal analysis technology applications in dental medicine [electronic resource] /
Oral healthcare and technologies [electronic resource] : breakthroughs in research and practice /
Glass-ceramic technology [electronic resource] /
Clinical applications of digital dental technology [electronic resource] /
Minimally invasive dental implant surgery /

News

Workshops

Date: Tuesday, September 26, 2017
Time: 4:10pm - 5:00pm
Location: Gerstein Library
Campus: St. George (Downtown) Campus

Learn how to safely operate the Makerbot Replicator 2 3D printers. You must complete this safety training session before you can use our 3D printers.

3D Printing Safety Training

Date: Tuesday, September 26 4:10pm - 5:00pm

Location: MADLab, Gerstein Science Information Centre, 1 Below, room B112

Presenters: Erica Lenton, Gerstein Librarian & Mike Spears, MADLab Manager

What's Covered: 

- overview of 3D Printing @ Gerstein + MADLab policies & guidelines for use

- instructions for safe & effective use of the 3D printers

- how to prepare a 3D design file for printing 

- basic design principles

Questions?

Send your questions to gerstein.3Dprinting@utoronto.ca or visit our website at: http://guides.library.utoronto.ca/3dprinting

Date: Monday, October 2, 2017
Time: 2:00pm - 4:00pm
Location: E.J. Pratt Library
Campus: St. George (Downtown) Campus

Research and Writing Seminars: Develop Your Scholarly Voice. Each session in this suite of four interactive seminars integrates the learning of academic research and writing skills and is taught by a librarian in collaboration with a writing instructor. The goal of each seminar is to help you develop your own voice as an emerging scholar by enabling you to identify, situate and substantiate your arguments in the context of the scholarly discussion taking place in your discipline. The seminars are designed for humanities and social sciences students, but all are welcome.

Take any three (3) of the four (4) seminars to earn credit on your Co-Curricular Record.

Writing to Cite

Learn how to develop effective strategies for academic research and how to correctly incorporate primary and secondary sources into your essays. Through short lectures, interactive class discussions and hands-on exercises, you will learn:

  • The role of citation practices in the scholarly conversation
  • The various styles of documentation
  • The mechanics of “writing up” your sources
  • The different types of publications and how to integrate and document your use of them
  • To incorporate close reading to develop your own research interests and arguments
  • What ideas you can claim as your own and which ones you cannot
  • How to avoid inadvertent plagiarism

Key terms for this session: close reading, signaling, quoting, paraphrasing

Location: E.J. Pratt Library, E-Classroom (room 306) Directions

Other seminars in this series include:

  • Critical Reading
  • Annotated Bibliographies

Literature Reviews

Date: Wednesday, October 4, 2017
Time: 2:00pm - 4:00pm
Presenter: Leanne Trimble
Location: Map & Data Library
Campus: St. George (Downtown) Campus

This workshop will introduce you to sources of Canadian data, with a focus on tools for discovering Statistics Canada data, including CANSIM, CHASS Census Analyser, and <odesi>. It will cover search strategies and techniques and allow hands-on time for exploring and discovering data of interest to your own research.

Date: Thursday, September 28, 2017
Time: 12:00pm - 3:00pm
Campus: St. George (Downtown) Campus

Does your thesis, research, or prototype have application outside the academic realm? Are you interested in entrepreneurship as a potential career path? Find out how the process of research commercialization works for graduate students at U of T, what makes a good invention disclosure, and what you need to know about intellectual property, market research, and campus resources.

This three-hour workshop includes:
1. Campus resources for startups
2.  Invention disclosures and research commercialization processes at U of T
3.  Databases and tools for business/market research

See full session description

When: September 28, 2017, 12-3 p.m.
Location: Room 253, ONRamp, second floor, Banting Bldg, 100 College St
Instructors:
Holly Inglis, Public Services Librarian, Rotman Business Information Centre, holly.inglis@rotman.utoronto.ca
Karen Temple, Entrepreneurship Manager, Innovations and Partnerships Office, karen.temple@utoronto.ca
Carey Toane, Entrepreneurship Librarian, Gerstein Science Information Centre, carey.toane@utoronto.ca